Publication Date

7-20-2021

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MS)

Committee Member

Hilburn, Andrew

Committee Member

Lou, Fei

Abstract

This thesis examines the role of social networks as an interaction factor in the relationship between negative emotions and juvenile delinquency by applying General Strain theory to study the differences in non-violent delinquency, violent delinquency, and status offenses among Hispanic females. Data were acquired from the Drug Use and Cultural Factors Among Hispanic Adolescents and Emerging Adults, Los Angeles (2006-2016), a restricted longitudinal survey file from Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). This study is a cross-sectional secondary data analysis in which the population studied is composed of Hispanic female ranging in ages from 14 to 17. Two types of quantitative analyses were performed: (1) linear regression analysis and (2) binary logistic regressions. Minority status strain in the form of acculturation was the only predictor of depression. Moreover, social networks proved to have an impact as an interaction factor in the relationship between depression and juvenile delinquency but only for status delinquency (lifetime cigarette use). Social networks did not have an impact in non-violent delinquency, violent delinquency, and status delinquency (lifetime alcohol use). Further research should consider looking into other aspects of social networks as an interaction factor in the relationship between negative emotions and juvenile delinquency.

Available for download on Thursday, March 17, 2022

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